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 1 
 on: Today at 05:55:40 AM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by GrayRodent
That is true. See if there is a probable cause for that. If you are noticing puddles of pee on a shelf or hard surface that would be unusual but could explain it. My chinchilla, being a standard gray, has a white belly, and I've never seen him get soaked with urine. He dies have some slight staining which I think is normal but it has never been wet. He doesn't pee on the shelf either. The worst he does is pee in his dust bath but the dust clumps like cat litter so he stays dry.

By getting an early diagnosis and treatment you should be able to avoid it becoming something serious if it is a UTI.

I agree that withholding the dust bath until you get a diagnosis is advisable. If the vaginal area is inflamed it is best to withhold dust baths for at least a week. Giving probiotics is a fairly common practice. Some vets may prescribe bene-bac. Mine did not. Not all vets agree on the effectiveness of giving them. The most important thing is that they keep eating their normal daily volume of food at a normal rate.

GI stasis is when the stomach and intestines stop flowing. (gastrointestinal stasis). If it occurs and is not reversed it is fatal. In chinchillas and other small animals GI stasis can occur because the animal stops eating and the gut has nothing to work on so it slows down. This further reduces the amount of available nutrients in the blood which causes depression and becomes a death spiral. The antibiotics are irritating to the bowels and may make the bowels more likely to go into stasis. Stress from the treatments can also contribute. Closely monitoring food and water intake and syringe feeding if there is trouble is the best way to prevent this. Once stasis occurs it can be difficult to reverse it because gas builds up in the intestines and can block them off. There are treatments and techniques to treat the problem but prevention is the best medicine for this.

I don't recommend bringing the other chinchilla. With pairs it seems that sometimes they can feed off of each other's stress. I've taken my chin to the vet before and he did just fine.

 2 
 on: Today at 01:10:09 AM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by mb30
Does she pee on any hard surfaces where she may be sitting in it? Like on a shelf or in a solid floor?

Another thing you can do is hold her facing away from you and check her vaginal opening for any swelling or discharge.
If you dont feel comfortable doing that then definitely take her to a vet.

One of my chins has some sort of infection there. I think she had it for a few days. I noticed her grooming more than usual and afterwards she would grind her teeth. They do this to sometimes clean stuff of their teeth so i knew something wasnt right. The vet confirmed and we were given baytril and shes made a full recovery.

I would say dont give her a sandbath until you figure out whats going on. Somebody correct me if im wrong about that.

If you do end up getting baytril ask the vet for critical care as well as a precautionary measure. I have read many stories where baytril made a chin lose its appetite completely. I didnt have that problem but she definitely did stop eating as much.
Also, ask about something to replace the good bacteria in her gut as baytril will kill that as well. Probiotics theyre called. Dont give that until 2 or 3 hours after the baytril.

If you look in this section there are a couple of threads right below dealing with uti and vaginal infections.


It seems like a lot of information to take in and it is but your chin will very likely make a full recovery if it is a uti.

The best thing you can do is really watch your chin. Spend a couple or a few hours just watching her and see if she is doing anything unusual...or if she makes any noises while peeing etc.

Hopefully it just is a case of her sitting in pee though.

 3 
 on: Today at 12:46:04 AM 
Started by mike - Last post by mb30
Also, be aware of the temperature in the room. A chin can very easily overheat if running around outside the cage. Im at 67 degrees here and i only let mine run for 10 minutes at a time...one of my chins is at full speed always and she will defintely get heat stroke if her outside play time is not managed.

If you have a rug you could roll it up so it maked a tunnel. Once the chin goes inside cap both ends with your hands and then put one end in the cage. I find this to be the least stressful way of getting my chins back in their cage if they dont go in on their own.

Although, one of them has learned whats going in and will rarely go into the tunnel now. So i put one end in the cage and one end on this ottoman we have and her natural curiosity gets her in every time hah.

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 08:11:14 PM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by iheartchins
What exactly is GI stasis?  I'll try to get an appointment tomorrow, if there are no openings tomorrow, I'll try Wednesday. I'm hoping it's nothing serious. Should I bring her cage mate with her to help lower stress?

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 07:47:03 PM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by GrayRodent
Yeah that worked. I agree you need to see a vet. If they see rabbits they should know what to do. Please express your concerns about GI stasis. Chinchillas are more sensitive to that than rabbits and have different dietary requirements.

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 06:50:44 PM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by iheartchins
Thanks! I'll try and get her a vet appointment tomorrow just in case. There are no exotic vets near me, but I guess any vet is most likely better than none. It's a small animal clinic. But here's the picture (sorry it's not good quality; she wouldn't stay still!) http://s1368.photobucket.com/user/tweetybirdy8/media/197547BA-7BFE-488C-8541-E6B576FFFE50_zps7ohit8vu.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0 I hope the link works..if by let me know

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 02:18:59 PM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by GrayRodent
If needed the antibiotic will be given orally. Usually twice a day with a syringe. It's not a pleasant procedure and is best done with two people. I hope you won't have to do that. I have done it myself but not for a UTI.

It seems that most chinchillas are okay with the meds but some are not and I've seen many cases where that happens. They end up loosing the chinchilla because it goes into GI stasis and by the time they start treating it it's too late. I think in most cases it is preventable because every time I ask how long their chinchilla had been off its food they were unable to determine that because they were not monitoring and suspected it had been for two or more days. Make sure to get detailed instructions from your vet on hand feeding and the proper supplies, if possible if you ever are prescribed antibiotics, especially baytril. Some veterinarians will prescribe hand feeding as part of their diet during the course of meds to prevent stasis, especially, if they are on a heavy dose.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 01:59:33 PM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by iheartchins
Thanks, I'll try and upload a picture this evening. If needed, how would I give her the antibiotic? By mouth? And do they always end up not eating with antibiotics or is it only in some cases?

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 01:14:24 PM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by GrayRodent
Yes you can upload a picture if you would like. The picture will have to be sized so it does not exceed 128,000 bytes.

The vet can do a physical exam and see if there is anything anatomically wrong and will also check for signs of inflammation and possible underlying causes like a foreign object. If there is an infection he will prescribe an antibiotic that should clear it up. It is possible they will do a culture where they take a swab of the area and view the microbes they collect under a microscope. Sometimes they can identify the pathogen to refine the medical treatment. Recovery should be less than two weeks in most cases.

With any antibiotic treatment be prepared to treat anorexia and talk to your vet about it. Sometimes it happens and when it is not discovered fatal complications usually occur.

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 11:44:23 AM 
Started by iheartchins - Last post by iheartchins
Can I upload a picture on here? If so I'll try to take a pic and show you what exactly it looks like. We'll try and take her to the vet if it is UTI. What would they be able to do for her?

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